Sasha

Alexander ‘Sasha’ Stewart, born 1892 in Edinburgh, moved to London and launched his professional photography career in 1914. In 1920, Sasha opened his first London studio in Bloomsbury. A technical virtuoso and popular amongst the upper class, the photographer’s theatrical and society portraits were frequently seen in sophisticated journals such as The Tatler, The Sketch and Illustrated London News.

As brilliant as he was charming, Sasha was known for his inventions and studio innovations, none more so than the Sashalite. Produced by General Electric with key input from the photographer, the Sashalite debuted in 1930 and was the first commercial flashbulb available in the UK. Sasha used the powerful light generated by the bulbs to capture his trendsetting and signature dramatic shadows and frozen motion.

Esme Fitzgibbon British actress in costume as Madeline for a stage production of ‘The Ratby sasha.1924

The English ballerina Dame Margot Fonteyn (Margaret Hookham) (1919 – 1991) holding a mask by sasha. 1920-30

A Norman Hartnell evening gown. by sasha. 1920-30

The Australian beauty Dorothy Blanchard, who has just left London to join the Ziegfeld Follies, reclining on a sumptuous bed. by sasha. 1925

The English actress Hermione Baddeley (1906 – 1986).. by sasha. 19220-30

Alice Joyce (1890 – 1955) in London to play the lead in a film, ‘The Passionate Adventure’. by sasha.1925

A woman wearing a fashionable hat decorated with leaf motifs by Peron. by sasha. 1925

A woman wearing a cloche hat decorated with flowers by sasha.1925-30

A unknown model wearing a Paquin feathered headdress. by sasha.1920-25

A woman wearing a fashionable woven hat decorated with jewellery by Peron. by sasha. 1925

A woman wearing a jewelled headdress designed by Paquin by sasha.1924

advertissement for A Schiaparelli hat by sasha. 1930s

An actress appearing in the play ‘Libel’ at the Playhouse theatre. . by sasha.1934

Portrait if the Dancer Kyra Alanova. . by sasha.1929

Show ring rider Mrs Sam Marsh wearing a top hat and a veil over her face. . by sasha.1920

The English actress Vivien Leigh (1913 – 1967). Original Publication in People Disc by sasha.Nd

Frances Day (1907 – 1984) in ‘Floodlight’.by sasha.1925

American authoress Anita Loos, who wrote ‘Gentleman Prefer Blondes’.. by sasha. nd

British actress Dorothy Seacombe by sasha. 1926

Lady Castlerosse modelling the medieval-style costume and wimple she will wear to the Galaxy Ball Pageant, held at London’s Park Lane Hotel. by sasha.1929

The American dancer, Ardath de Sales in costume for ‘Mercenary’, a show at London’s Hippodrome Theatre. by sasha. 1925

Entertainer Elsa McFarlane stands on the bonnet of a Rolls Royce car, mimicking the Silver Lady figurine, in a production of ‘The Co-Optimists’, at the Vaudeville Theatre in Londonby sasha. 1929

Dancer Muriel Gaunt by sasha. 1939

The Australian dancer Dorothy Blanchard, who has just left London to join the Ziegfeld Follies, sitting by the fireplace by sasha. 1925

The Film actress Marjory Brooks. by sasha.1927

Cecily Byrne as Lydia Webster in the Lyric Theatre’s production of ‘Baby Cyclone’. by sasha.1928

Catherine Lacy as Ricciada in the first production of ‘Night’s Candles’, at the Queen Theatre. by sasha.1933

The Glamorous Australian dancer Dorothy Blanchard smoking a cigarette. by sasha.1925

 

Kyra Nijinsky (1913 – 1998), daughter of the famous Russian dancer and one of the principals of ‘Cochran’s Streamline Revue’ at the Palace Theatre, London.. by sasha.1930s

Chorus girls in Felix Ferry’s Monte Carlo Follies are performing in London at Grosvenor House.. by sasha. 1930s

The Dancer Laura Devine performing a shadow dance during a production of C B Cochran’s show ‘This Year of Grace’ at the London Pavilion. by sasha.1928

A dancer dancing in a British National Opera Company production at His Majesty’s Theatre, London by sasha. 1924

Stanislawa Welska performs an exotic dance which produces a dramatic shadow. by sasha. 19330s

A dancer cowering from a shadowed pair of hands looming over her on stage. by sasha. 1930

The Singer and dancer Bunty Pain, one of Cecil B Cochran’s chorus girls, wearing a diaphanous dress. by sasha. 1929

Tilly Losch (1904 – 1974) dancing in an extravagant costume, in a scene from the show `Wake Up And Dream’. by sasha.1929

The Dancer and actress Tilly Losch (1904 – 1974), one of the principals in ‘Streamline Revue. by sasha.1934

Tilly Losch and Tony Birkmayr in ‘Wake Up And Dream’ at the London Pavilion Theatre. by sasha.1929

Austrian dancer Tilly Losch and Roman Jasinsky dancing in a production of the ballet ‘Errante’ at the Savoy Theatre, London, with choreography by George Balanchine, and costumes by Paul Tchelitchev sasha. 19230s

A couple dancing the Charleston in a scene from the play ‘Just A Kiss’ at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London. by sasha.Nd

dancer and choreographer Serge Lifar and classical Russian ballerina Alice Nikitina performing the Russian ballet La Chatte (‘The Cat) Music H .Saguet, choreography G. Balanchine, designs Gabo and Pevsner. by sasha.1927

Nini Theilade, Indonesian ballet dancer, adopting a ballet pose for a studio portrait by sasha. 1933

Musical comedy actress Jessie Matthews (1907 – 1981) poses in a swimsuit. by sasha.1931

The Russian ballet dancer Alexandra Danilova (1904 – 1997) dancing in a Diaghilev production of ‘Swan Lake’ by sasha.1926

The Actress Binnie Hale dancing in the musical comedy, ‘Mr Cinders’, at the Adelphi Theatre, London by sasha. 1929

Dancing nymphs, in a scene from the play ‘Comus’ at the Open Air Theatre, Regents Park, London by sasha.1934

Members of the Margaret Morris dance troupe dancing out-of-door in accordance with the Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) interpretation of dance.. by sasha.1927

Tap dancers in ‘Voila Les Dames’ at the Prince of Wales Theatre. London hold hearts in front of them as they dance by sasha.1935

British actress Jessie Matthews (1907 – 1981) wearing a headdress decorated with ostrich feathers for her appearance in Charles B Cochran’s musical spectacular ‘Ever Green’ at the Adelphi Theatre, London. by sasha.1930

Binnie Hale surrounded by a huge plume of feathers in the show, `Mr Cinders’’. by sasha.1929

An unusual view of the ‘Albertina Rasch Girls’ who appear in the show, ‘Wild Violets’ at the Drury Lane Theatre, London by sasha.1933

The Albertina Rasch chorus girls who are appearing in ‘Wild Violets.by sasha.1933

The Albertina Rasch Girls who appear in the show ‘Wild Violets’. From top to bottom Inga Anderson, Nosie Dale and Vida McLain..by sasha.1932

The English ballet dancer Leslie Burrows performing a dance entitled ‘Fear’. by sasha.1934

A woman standing on a beach. by sasha.1930

A couple kissing in a scene from the play ‘Just A Kiss’ at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London. by sasha. 1926

American dancers Estelle & Leroy, in action at the Savoy Hotel, London. by sasha. 1934

Composer and actor Ivor Novello (1892 – 1951) with just his face seen peering through a spy hole in a door by sasha. 1928

The English ballerina Dame Margot Fonteyn (Margaret Hookham) (1919 – 1991) holding a mask by sasha. 1920-30

A close-up of the hands of Jessie Matthews (1907 – 1981), dancer and film-star. by sasha.1930

Chorus girls singing on stage, whilst wearing eye masks by sasha.1930

A group in a model boat in a scene from the show ‘Peggy Ann’, at the Dalys Theatre by sasha.1927

English actress and dancer Phyllis Monkman (1892 – 1976) with Welsh composer and actor Ivor Novello (1893 – 1951) in ‘Downhill’ at the Queens Theatre. by sasha.1926

Noel Coward (1899 – 1973) and Gertrude Lawrence (1898 – 1952) in ‘Private Lives’ at the Phoenix theatre by sasha.Nd

Santa Proud Fashions by sasha.1930s

Ruby Stewart, currently appearing in a musical at the Gaiety Theatre, London by sasha.1937

Stage and screen actress Joyce Bland (1906-1963), who is currently playing the lead role in ‘Mary Bloome’ at the Embassy Theatre. by sasha.1931

Stage and screen actress Joyce Bland (1906-1963), who is currently playing the lead role in ‘Mary Bloome’ at the Embassy Theatre. by sasha.1931

random dance

Herman Mishkin- portrait of Anna Pavlova , nd

Sture Ekstrand Tre dansöser 1925

Sture Ekstrand Tree dansöser 1925

MADAME D’ORA DORA KALLMUS (1881–1963) ARTHUR BENDA (1885–1969) Bodenwieser-Schule, Vienna 1925 Vintage silver print

MADAME D’ORA DORA KALLMUS (1881–1963) ARTHUR BENDA (1885–1969) Bodenwieser-Schule, Vienna 1925 Vintage silver print

Anonyme- La danse des femmes, vers 1930- , Tirage cartoline ( Ebay)

Anonyme- La danse des femmes, vers 1930- , Tirage cartoline ( Ebay)

Arthur Benda, Der Tanz mit den goldenen Scheiben (The Dance with the Golden Disks), 1931 courtesy of the Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna

Arthur Benda, Der Tanz mit den goldenen Scheiben (The Dance with the Golden Disks), 1931 courtesy of the Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna

Byron Company - Two of Marion Morgan's dancers with flowing scarf, posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Byron Company – Two of Marion Morgan’s dancers with flowing scarf, posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Swinney ( source nypl) dancers partnering each other in mirror pose, 1920s

Swinney ( source nypl) dancers partnering each other in mirror pose, 1920s

 

Herman Mishkin- portrait of the Contortionist and Egyptian Dancer, Kyra, at the theathtre Winter Garden, 1920

Herman Mishkin- portrait of the Contortionist and Egyptian Dancer, Kyra, at the theathtre Winter Garden, 1920

Ida Rubinstein

La belle Ida Rubinstein des Ballets Russes, est née en Russie en 1885, elle n’était pas seulement une grande figure à l’intérieur de Ballet Russes, mais une icône de la Belle Époque.

Avec peu de formation officielle, elle est passée de figurante dans son premier rôle dans «Salomé», de Diaghilev ( dirigeant les Ballets Russes ) à Vedette grâce à ce dernier, qui lui offrit le premier rôle dans Cléopâtre. en effet, aidée par Mikhail Fokine, elle fait ses débuts en 1908, lors d’ un spectacle privé de Salomé d’Oscar Wilde, dans lequel elle s’est dénudée au cours de la Danse des sept voiles.
Sergei Diaghilev l’engage dans les Ballets Russes et elle a dansé le rôle-titre de Cléopâtre dans la saison de Paris de 1909, et Zobéide en Scherezade en 1910. Scherezade était admiré à l’époque pour sa sensualité racée et somptueuse mise en scène, mais de nos jours il est rarement effectué; au goût du jour, il est considéré comme trop d’une pantomime et son orientalisme alors à la mode semble daté.

Rubinstein fût beaucoup célébrée dans l’art, elle est devenue une véritable Muse, et a été peinte, sculptée, par de nombreux artistes , Valentin Serov, Demetre Chiparus , Antonio de La Gandara notamment,Mais surtout par sa compagne La peintre Romaine Brooks , avec laquelle elle eu une liaison durant trois années

Après avoir quitté les Ballets Russes, Rubinstein forme sa propre compagnie de danse, et chorégraphie plusieurs productions somptueuses. En 1911, elle a joué dans Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien. C’était à la fois un triomphe pour son modernisme stylisé et un scandale, l’archevêque de Paris interdit aux catholiques d’y assister en invoquant le fait Saint-Sébastien était joué par une femme et un Juif.

Après la Première Guerre mondiale, Rubinstein est apparu dans un certain nombre de pièces de théâtre, et dans le Istar de Staat à l’Opéra de Paris en 1924. Entre 1928 et 1929, elle a dirigé sa propre entreprise à Paris avec Nijinska en tant que chorégraphe. Elle a commandé et joué dans Boléro de Maurice Ravel en 1928. Elle a fermé l’entreprise en 1935, et a donné sa dernière performance dans le jeu Jeanne d’Arc au bûcher à Paris, 1939 et elle par ailleurs joué dans des films muets.

Ida Rubinstein in the role of Salome (French Photographer)© Bridgeman Art Library - Private Collection

Eugène Druet- Ida Rubinstein in the role of Salome, 1908  (French Photographer)© Bridgeman Art Library – Private Collection [  Translated into Russian from the verse drama by Oscar Wilde Music by Alexander Gazunov, Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory Choreography by Mikhail Fokine Costumes and Production designed by Léon Baskt]

Eugène Druet- Ida Rubinstein in the role of Salome, 1908 (French Photographer)© Bridgeman Art Library – Private Collection [ Translated into Russian from the verse drama by Oscar Wilde Music by Alexander Gazunov, Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory Choreography by Mikhail Fokine Costumes and Production designed by Léon Baskt]

Ida Rubinstein- CleopatrE, 1909

Ida Rubinstein- CleopatrE, 1909 [Music by Arensky, Glazunov, Glinka, and Mussorgsky Music for Cléopâtre’s disrobing scene: Mlada by Rimsky-Korsakov Choreography by Mikhail Fokine Costumes and Decor by Léon Baskt Produced by Serge Diaghilev, Serge Lifar, Gabrielle Astruc (and others)]

Ida Rubinstein- Cleopatre, 1909

Ida Rubinstein- Cleopatre, 1909

ida rubinstein as zobeida in schéhérazade (diaghilev, 1910)

Ida Rubinstein as zobeida in Schéhérazade, 1910, [Written by Alexandre Benois. Music by Rimsky-Korsakov. Choreography by Mikhail Fokine. Costumes and set design by Léon Bakst. Produced by Serge Diaghilev.]

Ida Rubinstein in Scheherazade 1910

Ida Rubinstein in Scheherazade 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein dans Séhérazade en 1910

Ida Rubinstein- Cleopatre, New -York Tribune, 17 October 1920

Ida Rubinstein- Cleopatre, New -York Tribune, 17 October 1920

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein, 1921

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein, 1921

Ida Rubinstein still from La Nave ( silent movie),1921

Ida Rubinstein still from La Nave ( silent movie),1921

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein- Abbe Phaedre, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein-  Phaedre, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein, 1923 2

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein- Abbe Phaedre, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein- Phaedre, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein- Phaedre, 1923

James Abbe- Ida Rubinstein- Phaedre, 1923

Ida Rubinstein in, Semiramis, by Boris Lipnitski, 1934.

Ida Rubinstein in, Semiramis, by Boris Lipnitski, 1934.

Ida Rubinstein in, Semiramis, by Boris Lipnitski, 1934.

Ida Rubinstein in, Semiramis, by Boris Lipnitski, 1934.

Ida Rubinstein en tenue de cavalière par Madame d'Ora, 1920s - Copie

Ida Rubinstein en tenue de cavalière par Madame d’Ora, 1920s

Ida Bubinstein, 1930

Ida Bubinstein, 1930

Ida Bubinstein, by Romaine Brooks

Romaine Brooks,Ida Bubinstein, 1911-12

Romaine Brooks,Ida Bubinstein, 1911-12

Romaine Brooks- La Venus Triste, 1914

Romaine Brooks- La Venus Triste, 1914

Romaine Brooks-Le Trajet, 1911

Romaine Brooks-Le Trajet, 1911

Romaine Brooks -The Cross of France, Ida Rubinstein , 1914

Romaine Brooks -The Cross of France, Ida Rubinstein , 1914

Romaine Brooks - Esquisse d'Ida Rubinstein, 1912

Romaine Brooks – Esquisse d’Ida Rubinstein, 1912

Romaine Brooks Ida Rubinstein 1917 - Copie

Romaine Brooks Ida Rubinstein 1917

Valentin Serov - Portrait of Ida Lvovna Rubinstein (as Salome), 1910

Valentin Serov – Portrait of Ida Lvovna Rubinstein (as Salome), 1910

 

Byron Company – Marion Morgan’s dancers

Byron Company -Marion Morgan's Dancers posing on the beach, Rye, New York. , 1920

Byron Company -Marion Morgan’s Dancers posing on the beach, Rye, New York. , 1920

Byron Company - Marion Morgan's dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Byron Company – Marion Morgan’s dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Athur Vitols for Byron Company - Marion Morgan's dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Athur Vitols for Byron Company – Marion Morgan’s dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Byron Company - One of Marion Morgan's dancers with a long, diaphanous scarf flowing in the sea breeze, posing on rock at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Byron Company – One of Marion Morgan’s dancers with a long, diaphanous scarf flowing in the sea breeze, posing on rock at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Byron Company - Two of Marion Morgan's dancers with flowing scarf, posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Byron Company – Two of Marion Morgan’s dancers with flowing scarf, posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York. 1920

Byron Company - one of the Marion Morgan's Dancers posing on the rock, Rye, New York. , 1920

Byron Company – one of the Marion Morgan’s Dancers posing on the rock, Rye, New York. , 1920

Athur Vitols for Byron Company -One of Marion Morgan's dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Athur Vitols for Byron Company -One of Marion Morgan’s dancers posing on rocks at the beach Rye, New York, 1920

Athur Vitols for Byron Company - Byron Company - Marion Morgan's Dancers, Three Girls and Reflections in Water. Photographs, Prints & Drawings 1917

Athur Vitols for Byron Company – Byron Company – Marion Morgan’s Dancers, Three Girls and Reflections in Water. Photographs, Prints & Drawings 1917

Athur Vitols for Byron Company -Marion Morgan's Dancers, Girl Washed Up on the Beach, August, 1917

Athur Vitols for Byron Company -Marion Morgan’s Dancers, Girl Washed Up on the Beach, August, 1917

some others photographs of  The Marion Morgan dancers by Genthle Here

Marguerite Acarin dite Akarova (1904-1999)

La Danseuse Marguerite Acarin, dite Akarova dans Mazurka ( Chopin) en 1924 Costume crée par Marcel-Louis Baugniet et réalisé par Akarova (Musée de la Photographie, Charleroi)

La Danseuse Marguerite Acarin, dite Akarova dans Mazurka ( Chopin) en 1924 Costume crée par Marcel-Louis Baugniet et réalisé par Akarova (Musée de la Photographie, Charleroi)

Robert de Smet – Akarova, nd

Née Marguerite Acarin à Saint-Josse en 1904, ayant épousé le peintre Marcel Louis Baugniet en 1923, elle s’ést associée très rapidement au mouvement avant-gardiste qui secouait, au début des années 30, les arts plastiques, la musique, le théâtre, et la littérature.

Audacieuse et indépendante, elle allait appliquer à la danse les principes du constructivisme russe et du futurisme italien. Pour elle, le spectacle était un tout et elle en réalisait chaque élément: chorégraphie, décor, costume, musique, éclairage,… Elle allait ainsi permettre un renouvellement de la danse belge alors embourbée dans un certain conservatisme. donnant à ses chorégraphies une dimension tant géométrique et plastique qu’émotionnelle.

Marcel- Louis Baugniet- Portrait of Akorava, 1923

Marcel- Louis Baugniet- Portrait of Akorava, 1923

 

Robert de Smet - Akarova in 1923, costume and backdrop designs by Marcel- louis Baugniet, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet – Akarova in 1923, costume and backdrop designs by Marcel- louis Baugniet, corpyright Sabam Brussels

marcel Louis baugniet,- Woodcuts from the serie Kaloprosopies, 1925

marcel Louis baugniet,- Woodcuts from the serie Kaloprosopies, 1925

Marcel louis baugnier- background for Akova' s dance, 1923

Marcel louis baugnier- background for Akova’ s dance, 1923

Marcel louis baugnier- La danse, 1925

Marcel Louis Baugnier- La danse, 1925

C’est à cette époque qu’elle allait devenir «Akarova» pour exprimer son appartenance aux grands mouvements révolutionnaires dans l’art.Pour elle, le spectacle était un tout et elle en réalisait chaque élément: chorégraphie, décor, costume, musique, éclairage,… Elle allait ainsi permettre un renouvellement de la danse belge alors embourbée dans un certain conservatisme.

Akarova costume for Gymnopédie N°1, 1925-1932, fabric by ML.baugniet( archives Bruxelles)

Akarova costume for Gymnopédie N°1, 1925-1932, fabric by ML.Baugniet( archives Bruxelles)

Unknown photographer- Akarova in la danse d'Amour de Falia, 1929, in costume of her own design, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Unknown photographer- Akarova in la danse d’Amour de Falia, 1929, in costume of her own design, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Unknown photographer- Akarova in la danse d’Amour de Falia, 1929, in costume of her own design, corpyright Sabam Brussels

En 1926, Akarova arrête de pratiquer le chant afin de se consacrer pleinement à la danse qu’elle sortira des ornières du ballet classique. Figure de proue du modernisme de l’entre-deux-guerres, elle compose de nombreuses œuvres chorégraphiques dans la mouvance des Ballets russes, qu’elle danse sur les musiques de ses contemporains, entre autres Claude Debussy, Paul Dukas, Maurice Ravel, Darius Milhaud et Igor Stravinski. Sa danse se veut tantôt vigoureuse, tantôt hiératique, où les décors et les costumes, dont ses costumes constructivistes — qu’elle réalise elle-même — utilisent des lignes brisées ou ondulées, des motifs asymétriques, des polychromies discordantes. Préférant Bruxelles à une carrière internationale, Akarova donne de nombreux récitals de chant et de danse dans différents théâtres ou dans des demeures privées. Akarova installe en 1934 un studio réservé à ses élèves au 45 rue Jean d’Ardenne à Ixelles. Elle y donna également des représentations.

Akarova interprétant le Boléro de Ravel en 1930. Costume créé et réalisé par la danseuse

Robert de Smet – Akarova In Sicilienne, 1932 , in costume of her own design in 1924, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet - Akarova In Sicilienne, 1932 , in costume of her own design in 1924, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet – Akarova In Sicilienne, 1932 , in costume of her own design in 1924, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Portrait de la Danseuse Marguerite Acarin, dite Akarova, (1904 -1999) Couverture de la Revue AZ, Bruxelles 1933

Portrait de la Danseuse Marguerite Acarin, dite Akarova, (1904 -1999) Couverture de la Revue AZ, Bruxelles 1933

Robert de Smet - Akarova In Berceuse, 1934 , in costume of her own design , corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet – Akarova In Berceuse, 1934 , in costume of her own design , corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet - Akarova in Allegro Barbaro, 1929, in costume of her own design, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Robert de Smet – Akarova in Allegro Barbaro, 1929, in costume of her own design, corpyright Sabam Brussels

Marcel G. Lefrancq - Portrait d’Akarova, 1938 Photomontage Akarova et le masque du diable dans l’histoire du soldat (Stravinsky) 1935

Marcel G. Lefrancq – Portrait d’Akarova, 1938 Photomontage Akarova et le masque du diable dans l’histoire du soldat (Stravinsky) 1935

Dans son souci de contrôler totalement ses scénographies, Akarova demande à l’architecte Jean-Jules Eggericx de construire pour elle une salle de spectacle au 72 de l’avenue de l’Hippodrome à Ixelles, inaugurée le 30 janvier 1937, et où se déroula la partie la plus importante de sa carrière, salle qui fermera ses portes en 1957 suite aux réclamations du voisinage. La salle, de style Art déco, est aujourd’hui sauvegardée.

Akarova a fait don de ses costumes et décors de scène au Musée des Archives d’architecture moderne, marquant par là sa volonté d’inscrire son œuvre dans le contexte plus large de l’architecture, entendue comme une synthèse des arts.
Livre: Akarova: Spectacles et Avants-Gardes, AAM Editions

Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G hypnotisée dansant 1902-1904

Un des portfolios les plus « chers » à mon cœur et un des plus rares à mes yeux. D’une part car il traite de la thématique de la danse, mais d’autre part car il traite de la technique de l’hypnose. Performance des années 1900 de surcroit, d’une qualité rare et d’une splendeur sans égale.

On pourrait penser à une allégorie de l’enfantement, alors  qu’elle danse la Chevauchée de la Walkyrie.

Je ne corrige et nettoie même pas les photographies , tant elles sont superbes avec leurs pixels manquants, leurs tâches, leurs rayures… parfois je nettoie,  parfois pas.

pas besoin de grands blablablas, voici comment mr Emile Magnin a procédé, au bord du chemin… il a conduit jusqu’à l’état second Magdeleine G. qui en bonne « hystérique », est un sujet réceptif et entre dans la danse , c’est le cas de le dire et s’en donne et nous donne à cœur joie. Il semble qu’elle passe par des phases  d’acendance, de plateau, de terreur, et de béatitude.[Ces photographies ne sont pas sans rappeler celles réalisées à l’hôpital Charcot pour les études sur l’hystérie. ]

Une petite pensée toute particulière pour  La « Madame » de Laurent et Chamamland deux amoureuses de la danse

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas -Photographies de l'album Boissonnas 1903-1904 Magdeleine G. hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas -Photographies de l’album Boissonnas 1903-1904 Magdeleine G. hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant La Mort d'Iseult, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant La Mort d’Iseult, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant sous hypnose, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre
François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant sous hypnose, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre.

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre.

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Automne, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Automne, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Ete, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Ete, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant misiere de T, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant misiere de T, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant La Mort d'Iseult, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant La Mort d’Iseult, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre.

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre.

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant sous hypnose, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant sous hypnose, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Chevauchée de la Walkyrie, hypnotisée par Emile Magnin, 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant Automne, hypnotisée Le chien était blotti... (Verlaine), 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant Automne, hypnotisée Le chien était blotti… (Verlaine), 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre 5

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant , hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas - Magdeleine G. dansant hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d'argent sur verre

François Frédéric dit Fred Boissonnas – Magdeleine G. dansant hypnotisée , 1902-1904 Négatif au gelatino-bromure d’argent sur verre

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Présenté ici les scans du livre, Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923. les photographies ont été prises en 1922. j’y ai ajouté des tirages plus clairs de ce livre.

Anita Berber (1899-1928), and to a lesser extent her husband/dance partner Sebastian Droste (1892-1927), have come to epitomise the decadence within Weimar era Berlin, their colourful personal lives overshadowing to a large extent their careers in dance, film and literature. Yet the couple’s daring and provocative performances are being re-assessed within the history of the development of expressive dance, and their extraordinary book ‘Tänze des Lasters, des Grauens und der Ekstase’ (‘Dances of Vice, Horror and Ecstasy’-1922), is a ‘gesamkunstwerk’ (total work of art) of Expressionist ideology largely unrecognised outside a devoted cult following.

Berber is the better known of the couple. Born in Dresden into a liberal middle class family, her parents separated a year later. Her father remarried and her mother, in pursuit of acting career, left Anita in the care of her grandmother. Berber was partly educated in the newly built Jaques-Dalcroze institute at Hellerau, a progressive utopian experiment which extolled the principles of natural harmony in work and everyday life, and used euthythmics as a teaching method. Eurhythmics aimed « to enable pupils, at the end of their course, to say, not « I know, » but « I have experienced,” « (Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, ‘Rhythm Music & Education’). Mary Wegman (1886-1973), who would develop ‘ausdruckstanz’ (expressive or Expressionist dance) and later become one of the century’s major choreographers, was also a pupil at the same time as Berber, though it is not known if they ever met. Below is a 1921(?) clip of Wigman performing ‘Hexentanz’.

At fourteen Berber rejoined her mother and, moving to Berlin, joining a troupe of performers led by Rita Sachetto initially performing alongside another influential dancer Valeska Gert (1892-1978), much of whose work is now regarded as proto performance-art. Berbers style, formally influenced by Eurythmics, began to incorporate Expressionist sensibilities and this mixture – fused with her dynamism and intense sexuality, gained her press notices which soon led her to be hailed as a new ‘wonder in the art of dance’.

She also began to develop a film career performing in a number of films directed by Richard Oswald (1880-1963). These included the melodrama, ‘Prostitution’ (acting alongside Conrad Veidt) and the equally controversial ‘Different From The Others’ (both made in 1919) the later taking homosexuality as its theme. Berber also appeared briefly in Fritz Langs’ ‘Dr Mabuse’ (1921).

Her personal life also contributed to raising her public profile. Married, in name only, to an Oswald scriptwriter, she conducted numerous lesbian alliances (Marlene Dietrich allegedly among them) and fuelled her polysexual/decadent lifestyle with vast ingestions of cocaine, cognac, opiates and ether.

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Sebastian Drostes background is more obscure. He was born Willy Knobloch into a wealthy manufacturing family in Hamburg where he went to art school emerging as « a classic dandy, acerbic homosexual and art snob » (Mel Gordon: ‘The Seven Addictions and Five Professions of Anita Berber: Weimar Berlin’s Priestess of Decadence’ p. 116).

He was drafted in 1915 and disappears from view, to resurface in 1919 in the major Epressionist journal of the day ‘Die Sturm’ to which he contributed poetry. Later that year he moved to Berlin and as ‘Sebastian Droste’ began work as a dancer for the Celly de Rheidt company which specialised in what were termed ‘schönheitsabende’ (beauty evenings), the ‘beauty’ aspect being the near nakedness of the performers. They specialised in performing ‘artistic’ interpretations of ‘uplifting’ classical works which they hoped would prevent them from attracting police attention. However De Rheidts’ luck expired in 1921 with their interpretation of Philip Calderons’ painting, ‘St. Elizabeth of Hungary’s Great Act of Renunciation’ (1891) probably for its’ blasphemous content rather than obscenity (though the subsequent discovery that some of the performers were underage did not help). As a result of this Droste became unemployed.

With Berber now a film starlet, dancer of note, and already fictionalised in a novel by Vicki Baum entitled ‘Die Tänze der Ina Raffay’ Droste was able to obtain a contract for them to perform material at Viennas Great Konzerthaus-saal. This production was to become the ‘Dances of Vice, Horror and Ecstasy. Created in just under five months it was a mixture of old Berber material and new works to be danced by Berber and Droste either together or as solo pieces. The book of the same title was also produced, though this was not published until the following year.

The show received mixed reviews, but was overtaken by scandal when Droste was arrested for attempting to pass a forged credit note for 50 million Kroner in order to partially pay off his own and Berbers’ debts. Drostes’ creditors convinced the court to allow him to continue working until it went to trial. If they could continue to perform, they would make money to pay their debts. However, Droste then signed ‘exclusive’ contracts with three different theatres and although one theatre eventually managed to gain exclusivity, the couple also broke that agreement. The International Actors Union became involved and banned them from performing on any continental variety stage for two years.This was the beginning of the end of their relationship. The publicity generated made them notorious in Germany and Austria, but they had little opportunity to work and drug habits to maintain. Both returned to Berlin. In October 1923 Droste stole what he could of Berbers jewels and furs using the money raised by their sale to leave for New York. They had been married for ten months. Berber had rapidly divorced Droste and managed to pull herself together enough to form ‘Troupe Anita Berber’ performing in various Berlin night-clubs, though once again her volatility resulted in bans and dismissals. She quickly married American dancer Henri-Chátin Hoffman in autumn 1924. He helped to revive Berbers career with shows featuring a mix of old favourites such as ‘Morphine’ (its music, specially composed for her by Mischa Spoliansky was a hit of its day) and new material.

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The book

Berber and Droste chose to express themselves almost exclusively through the Expressionist/Modernist ethos, which was in itself filtered through the angst of Germany during the Weimar period.

Expressionism had been in existence before Weimar  and, like many art movements, it had no formal beginnings, as opposed to a ‘school’ of artists who might band together under a common technique. It was fundamentally a reaction against the Impressionists who were seen by the Modernists as merely portrayers of ‘reality’ but who had failed to add anything of the artists own interior processes such as intuition, imagination and dream. This new wave of artists found inspiration in painters such as Van Gogh and Matisse but also drew from writers such as Rimbaud, Baudelaire, and the Symbolists, together with the philosophy of Nietzsche and Freudian psychology.

Expressionists believed the artist should utilise « what he perceives with his innermost senses, it is the expression of his being; all that is transitory for him is only a symbolic image; his own life is his most important consideration. What the outside world imprints on him, he expresses within himself. He conveys his visions, his inner landscape and is conveyed by them ». Herwert Walden: ‘Erster Deutscher Herbstsalaon’ (1913).

The image is the poem as portrayed in the book by D’Ora.  Interestingly, it is doubted whether the dance was performed (at least in Vienna) topless. Once again, this would indicate that the book is to be considered as its own specific entity.

The poems cite their inspirations: artists Wassily Kandinsky, Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso and Matthias Grünewald and authors lsuch as Villiers De L’Isle Adam, Edgar Allan Poe, Paul Verlaine, E.T.A. Hoffman and Hanns Heinz Ewers

 One Poem from the book
Cocaïne / Danced by Anita Beber/ Music By saint Saëns


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Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

 

Madame d’Ora- Anita Berber und Sebastian Droste, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Berber und Sebastian Droste, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber,as a Spanish Dandy in Caprice Espagnol. , 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber,as a Spanish Dandy in Caprice Espagnol. , 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, Tanz Kokain,1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, Tanz Kokain,1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

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