Stan VanDerBeek (1927–1984)

« VanDerBeek studied art and architecture first at Cooper Union College in New York and then at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, where he met architect Buckminster Fuller, composer John Cage, and choreographer Merce Cunningham. VanDerBeek began his career in the 1950s making independent art film while learning animation techniques and working painting scenery and set designs for the American TV show, Winky Dink and You. His earliest films, made between 1955 and 1965 mostly consist of animated paintings and collage films, combined in a form of organic development.

VanDerBeek’s ironic compositions were created very much in the spirit of the surreal and dadaist collages on Max Ernst, but with a wild, rough informality more akin to the expressionism of the Beat Generation. In the 1960s, VanDerBeek began working with the likes of Claes Oldenburg and Allan Kaprow, as well as representatives of modern dance, such as Merce Cunningham and Yvonne Rainer. Building his Movie Drome theater at Stony Point, New York, at just about the same time, he designed shows using multiple projectors. These presentations contained a very great number of random image sequences and continuities, with the result that none of the performances were alike.

His desire for the utopian led him to work with Ken Knowlton in a co-operation at Bell Labs, where dozens of computer animated films and holographic experiments were created by the end of the 1960s. Between 1964 and 1967 Vanderbeek created Poem Field, a series of 8 computer-generated animations with Ken Knowlton.

During the same period, he taught at many universities, reserarching new methods of representation, from the steam projections at the Guggenheim Museum to the interactive television transmissions of his Violence Sonata broadcast on several channels in 1970. He ran the University of Maryland, Baltimore County visual arts program until his death.

His daughter is artist Sara VanDerBeek. » Wilkipedia

Stan VanDerBeek- nd

Stan VanDerBeek- nd

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

Stan VanDerBeek- A La Mode ,1958

 film : A rapidly edited, surreal collage animation: “A montage of women and appearances, a fantasy about beauty and the female, a fomage, a mirage. An attire satire.” Stan VanDerBeek

Stan VanDerBeek- What, Who, How 1960

Stan VanDerBeek- What, Who, How 1960

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from Breathdeath , 1957

Film , Here

Stan VanDerBeek- (death), photo painting 1964-67

Stan VanDerBeek- (death), photo painting 1964-67

Stan VanDerBeek- nd

Stan VanDerBeek- nd

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from  See saw , 1969

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from See saw , 1969

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from  See saw , 1965

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from See saw , 1965

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from  See saw , 1965

Stan VanDerBeek- Collage from See saw , 1965

Stan VanDerBeek- The humain face is a monument, 1964

Stan VanDerBeek- The humain face is a monument, 1964

Stan VanDerBeek- Movies disposable art synthetic media and intelligence , 1964 crop

Stan VanDerBeek- Movies disposable art synthetic media and intelligence , 1964 crop

Stan VanDerBeek- Tomorrow, 1956

Stan VanDerBeek- Tomorrow, 1956

Stan VanDerBeek in front of Movie Mural. Installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston,  1968

Stan VanDerBeek in front of Movie Mural. Installation view, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 1968 more about his installation HERE  and HERE

 

Waldemar Eide

Waldemar Eide -Idol. Portrait of unknown woman. The image has characterized the front page of the magazine Hvar 8 days in March 1924.

Waldemar Eide - Female act on his knees behind the bound hands, ca. 1919)

Waldemar Eide – Female act on his knees behind the bound hands, ca. 1919)

waldemar-eide-etude-de-nu-ca-1930_e

Waldemar Eide – Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide - Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide – Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide - Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide – Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide - study of nude, 1930

Waldemar Eide – study of nude, 1930

Waldemar Eide - Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide – Etude de nu, ca. 1930

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide -Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide -Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide - Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide – Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide Greta Nissen

Waldemar Eide 20s Greta Nissen Modern Dance

Waldemar Eide 20s Greta Nissen Modern Dance

 

Waldemar Eide Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide Grethe Ruzt-Nissen, nd

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920.

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920.

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina in Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina in Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina in Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920

Waldemar Eide- Vera Fokina in Dance of Salome, Photograms of the Year 1920

Waldemar Eide -Vera Fokina, figure de danse, 1919

Waldemar Eide -Vera Fokina, figure de danse, 1919

Waldemar Eide - Vera Fokina, 1919

Waldemar Eide – Vera Fokina, 1919

Waldemar Eide -Portrait of unknown woman., 1920s

Johan Hagemeyer

Johan Hagemeyer was a creative photographer who sometimes retouched or manipulated his photos. He was a contemporary and colleague of both Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston, who both encouraged him to develop his skills in the photography field. He distanced himself from his more famous contemporaries when they disapproved of doctoring photographs. He felt that photography as an art form did not end with just the taking of a photograph. If it could be artistically improved he did so, much to the chagrin of his contemporaries.

Hagemeyer also did not become as well-known as his contemporaries because he apparently did not market his photos aggressively. Upon his death in 1962, his complete oeuvre was found in his home. It is presently in the control of the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley. It contains 6,785 photographic items

Hagemeyer was born in a lower middle class family in Amsterdam on June 1, 1884. He was one of four siblings and the parents were clearly encouraging their children to gain a good education so that they would be able to live a more affluent lifestyle than they did. Johan left school in his mid-teens to join an insurance brokerage firm. He was intellectually curious and became interested in literature, the arts and social sciences. He explored mysticism, anarchism, vegetarianism, politics and anything of interest to his curious mind.

Along the way he developed an interest in horticulture, and was able to leave his job and go back to school to study it. Along the way two of his brothers also developed an interest in horticulture. After some time they decided to explore the practice of horticulture by growing fruit trees. America seemed the place to try it out, and that is how the three Hagemeyer siblings ended up in the United States, in California to be exact. The exact date of their arrival is not known but it must have been between 1905 and 1915.

While in Holland, Hagemeyer already had become interested in photography, and it appears that after their arrival in the USA his two brothers became fruit growers but he became a photographer. He met photographer Alfred Stieglitz as early as 1916. Stieglitz convinced him to devote his life to photography.

Hagemeyer moved between San Francisco and Carmel, and it was at Carmel that he met Edward Weston and the two developed a strong friendship which lasted until the two developed different views on how photography should be practiced. Although they apparently stayed in contact, their friendship cooled thereafter.

Although his colleagues, Stieglitz and Weston, became quite famous with their photography, Hagemeyer apparently was unable to find a market for his photographs. Or he may not have been as much of a promoter of his photographs. At his death the above-mentioned collection of photographs were found at this home. They were fortunately saved for posterity ;

Little is known about Hagemeyer’s personal life. Was he married? Did he leave descendants? What happened to his two brothers? None of it has been found. It appears he was a bit of a loner, and may have died without any close friends or relatives at his side. It appears to be a rather tragic story. But perhaps it was not. He will be remembered for what he left behind. Please go to the two web sites and view some or all of his photographs. They are magic and artistic.

 

Johan Hagemeyer Magnolia, ca. 1925 Gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Rose. [Pasadena.] , 1929 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer – Silver Moon (Rose) , 1932 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer Talisman Rose, 1936 [tinted petals, raised one at left shading center of bloom] gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer ‘Clematis in black bowl ,n.d. Gelatin silver print

 

Johan Hagemeyer Geraniums , 1942 Gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer Elsa Naess , nd gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, nd gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, nd gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess , 1932 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Charlotte Loeb , 1944 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Marguertie Churchill, 1931 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elaine Whitaker , 1941 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer, Sculpture. The Dark Lady, by Herbert Diamant, 1927

Johan Hagemeyer – The Dark Lady.” [By Herbert Diamant] [photographic print], 1927 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer – Elsa Naess, 1931

Johan Hagemeyer Elsa Naess, Impersonating, 1928 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, 1930 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elayne Hopper, nd gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, 1930 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, 1930 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, 1930 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess, 1930 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Tina Modotti , 1922 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Tina Modotti , 1922 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Tina Modotti , 1922 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer – Elizabeth Lynn, 1934

Johan Hagemeyer -Portrait of a pianist Antoinette Detcheva. 1931-38 Silver print

Johan Hagemeyer – Legs of Nude, 1930 , 1927 gelatin silver print

Johan Hagemeyer -Untitled, 1930. Gelatin silver print

Edward Weston, Johan Hagemeyer, 1925

Johan Hagemeyer -Elsa Naess (with Johan Hagemeyer) , 1928 gelatin silver print

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Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922 text by Thea Girardelli. Verlag der Schönheit, Ed° Dresden, 1922 [ Photography taken in 1921 ]

Né en Moravie, Franz Fiedler (1885- 1956) est l’élève du photographe allemand Hugo Erfurth. Ce passionné de photographie est considéré comme un excentrique durant son apprentissage alors qu’il travaille avec les plus grands d’Europe de 1905 à 1911 dont le photographe Rudolph Dührkoop. C’est en 1911 qu’il gagne le premier prix de photographie de l’exposition de Turin ,  il se fait un nom et expose à Prague en 1913. Il fait parti du cercle intellectuel de Jaroslav Hasek et Egon Erwin Kisch et installe son studio à Dresde en 1916. A Partir de 1919,  il se lie d’une grande  amitié avec Mme d’Ora  (Dora Kallmus) et son mari , et il commence  à travailler avec un appareil photo de pliage 9 × 12 , et en 1924  il est  l’un des premiers photographes professionnels à utiliser un Leica.

Le studio de Fiedler a été détruit le 13 Février 1945 et tout ce qui  restait était une boîte de photographies  qui a été déposé avec sa famille en Moravie. Après 1945, il n’avait plus son propre studio et a gagné sa vie en RDA comme auteur de livres sur la photographie.

Others articles about Franz Fiedler (1885- 1956)

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922  text by Thea Girardelli. Verlag der Schönheit, Ed° Dresden, 1922 [ Photography taken in 1921 ]

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate], 1922

Franz Fiedler -Erotischer Totentanz, 1923

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Franz Fiedler-From the portfolio narre tod, mein spielgesell [fool death, my playmate, 1922

Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

Dancing with Helen Moller; 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918 10

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918 10

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918 10

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

From the book Dancing with Helen Moller 1918

Dancing with Helen Moller; 1918

Helen Moller photographed by Rufus Porter Moody, c-1910s

Theda Bara as Vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film “A Fool There Was »directed by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire ,  1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film « A Fool There Was »directed by Frank Powell]

©-Theda Bara- 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the f

Theda Bara, as the vampire ,  1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film “A Fool There Was »directed by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell]

Theda Bara, as the vampire ,  1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell].

Theda Bara, as the vampire , 1915 -[in a publicity shot for the film A Fool There Wasdirected by Frank Powell].

 Underwood & Underwood - Portrait of Theda Bara in A Fool There Was directed by frank Powell, 1915

Underwood & Underwood – Portrait of Theda Bara in A Fool There Was directed by frank Powell, 1915

 Underwood & Underwood - Theda Bara, as the vampire , in A Fool There Was directed by Frank Powell, 1915

Underwood & Underwood – Theda Bara, as the vampire , in A Fool There Was directed by Frank Powell, 1915 Here

 More works Underwood & Underwood

® Brassai-Opium Party,1931

© Brassai -Self-portrait in an Opium Den- 1931

© Brassai and his Opium Den moments-1931

© Brassai -Woman smoking opium-1931

© Brassai-Opium Party-1931

© Brassaï, Woman Smoking Opium, 1931

© Brassaï- Repaire d’Opium, photogravure. c1931-1932