Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Présenté ici les scans du livre, Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923. les photographies ont été prises en 1922. j’y ai ajouté des tirages plus clairs de ce livre.

Anita Berber (1899-1928), and to a lesser extent her husband/dance partner Sebastian Droste (1892-1927), have come to epitomise the decadence within Weimar era Berlin, their colourful personal lives overshadowing to a large extent their careers in dance, film and literature. Yet the couple’s daring and provocative performances are being re-assessed within the history of the development of expressive dance, and their extraordinary book ‘Tänze des Lasters, des Grauens und der Ekstase’ (‘Dances of Vice, Horror and Ecstasy’-1922), is a ‘gesamkunstwerk’ (total work of art) of Expressionist ideology largely unrecognised outside a devoted cult following.

Berber is the better known of the couple. Born in Dresden into a liberal middle class family, her parents separated a year later. Her father remarried and her mother, in pursuit of acting career, left Anita in the care of her grandmother. Berber was partly educated in the newly built Jaques-Dalcroze institute at Hellerau, a progressive utopian experiment which extolled the principles of natural harmony in work and everyday life, and used euthythmics as a teaching method. Eurhythmics aimed « to enable pupils, at the end of their course, to say, not « I know, » but « I have experienced,” « (Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, ‘Rhythm Music & Education’). Mary Wegman (1886-1973), who would develop ‘ausdruckstanz’ (expressive or Expressionist dance) and later become one of the century’s major choreographers, was also a pupil at the same time as Berber, though it is not known if they ever met. Below is a 1921(?) clip of Wigman performing ‘Hexentanz’.

At fourteen Berber rejoined her mother and, moving to Berlin, joining a troupe of performers led by Rita Sachetto initially performing alongside another influential dancer Valeska Gert (1892-1978), much of whose work is now regarded as proto performance-art. Berbers style, formally influenced by Eurythmics, began to incorporate Expressionist sensibilities and this mixture – fused with her dynamism and intense sexuality, gained her press notices which soon led her to be hailed as a new ‘wonder in the art of dance’.

She also began to develop a film career performing in a number of films directed by Richard Oswald (1880-1963). These included the melodrama, ‘Prostitution’ (acting alongside Conrad Veidt) and the equally controversial ‘Different From The Others’ (both made in 1919) the later taking homosexuality as its theme. Berber also appeared briefly in Fritz Langs’ ‘Dr Mabuse’ (1921).

Her personal life also contributed to raising her public profile. Married, in name only, to an Oswald scriptwriter, she conducted numerous lesbian alliances (Marlene Dietrich allegedly among them) and fuelled her polysexual/decadent lifestyle with vast ingestions of cocaine, cognac, opiates and ether.

*********

Sebastian Drostes background is more obscure. He was born Willy Knobloch into a wealthy manufacturing family in Hamburg where he went to art school emerging as « a classic dandy, acerbic homosexual and art snob » (Mel Gordon: ‘The Seven Addictions and Five Professions of Anita Berber: Weimar Berlin’s Priestess of Decadence’ p. 116).

He was drafted in 1915 and disappears from view, to resurface in 1919 in the major Epressionist journal of the day ‘Die Sturm’ to which he contributed poetry. Later that year he moved to Berlin and as ‘Sebastian Droste’ began work as a dancer for the Celly de Rheidt company which specialised in what were termed ‘schönheitsabende’ (beauty evenings), the ‘beauty’ aspect being the near nakedness of the performers. They specialised in performing ‘artistic’ interpretations of ‘uplifting’ classical works which they hoped would prevent them from attracting police attention. However De Rheidts’ luck expired in 1921 with their interpretation of Philip Calderons’ painting, ‘St. Elizabeth of Hungary’s Great Act of Renunciation’ (1891) probably for its’ blasphemous content rather than obscenity (though the subsequent discovery that some of the performers were underage did not help). As a result of this Droste became unemployed.

With Berber now a film starlet, dancer of note, and already fictionalised in a novel by Vicki Baum entitled ‘Die Tänze der Ina Raffay’ Droste was able to obtain a contract for them to perform material at Viennas Great Konzerthaus-saal. This production was to become the ‘Dances of Vice, Horror and Ecstasy. Created in just under five months it was a mixture of old Berber material and new works to be danced by Berber and Droste either together or as solo pieces. The book of the same title was also produced, though this was not published until the following year.

The show received mixed reviews, but was overtaken by scandal when Droste was arrested for attempting to pass a forged credit note for 50 million Kroner in order to partially pay off his own and Berbers’ debts. Drostes’ creditors convinced the court to allow him to continue working until it went to trial. If they could continue to perform, they would make money to pay their debts. However, Droste then signed ‘exclusive’ contracts with three different theatres and although one theatre eventually managed to gain exclusivity, the couple also broke that agreement. The International Actors Union became involved and banned them from performing on any continental variety stage for two years.This was the beginning of the end of their relationship. The publicity generated made them notorious in Germany and Austria, but they had little opportunity to work and drug habits to maintain. Both returned to Berlin. In October 1923 Droste stole what he could of Berbers jewels and furs using the money raised by their sale to leave for New York. They had been married for ten months. Berber had rapidly divorced Droste and managed to pull herself together enough to form ‘Troupe Anita Berber’ performing in various Berlin night-clubs, though once again her volatility resulted in bans and dismissals. She quickly married American dancer Henri-Chátin Hoffman in autumn 1924. He helped to revive Berbers career with shows featuring a mix of old favourites such as ‘Morphine’ (its music, specially composed for her by Mischa Spoliansky was a hit of its day) and new material.

*********

The book

Berber and Droste chose to express themselves almost exclusively through the Expressionist/Modernist ethos, which was in itself filtered through the angst of Germany during the Weimar period.

Expressionism had been in existence before Weimar  and, like many art movements, it had no formal beginnings, as opposed to a ‘school’ of artists who might band together under a common technique. It was fundamentally a reaction against the Impressionists who were seen by the Modernists as merely portrayers of ‘reality’ but who had failed to add anything of the artists own interior processes such as intuition, imagination and dream. This new wave of artists found inspiration in painters such as Van Gogh and Matisse but also drew from writers such as Rimbaud, Baudelaire, and the Symbolists, together with the philosophy of Nietzsche and Freudian psychology.

Expressionists believed the artist should utilise « what he perceives with his innermost senses, it is the expression of his being; all that is transitory for him is only a symbolic image; his own life is his most important consideration. What the outside world imprints on him, he expresses within himself. He conveys his visions, his inner landscape and is conveyed by them ». Herwert Walden: ‘Erster Deutscher Herbstsalaon’ (1913).

The image is the poem as portrayed in the book by D’Ora.  Interestingly, it is doubted whether the dance was performed (at least in Vienna) topless. Once again, this would indicate that the book is to be considered as its own specific entity.

The poems cite their inspirations: artists Wassily Kandinsky, Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso and Matthias Grünewald and authors lsuch as Villiers De L’Isle Adam, Edgar Allan Poe, Paul Verlaine, E.T.A. Hoffman and Hanns Heinz Ewers

 One Poem from the book
Cocaïne / Danced by Anita Beber/ Music By saint Saëns


**********

 

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

 

Madame d’Ora- Anita Berber und Sebastian Droste, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Berber und Sebastian Droste, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber,as a Spanish Dandy in Caprice Espagnol. , 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber,as a Spanish Dandy in Caprice Espagnol. , 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, Tanz Kokain,1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, Tanz Kokain,1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d’Ora- Anita Beber, 1922

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d'ora - photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

Madame d’ora – photography for Dances of Vice, Horror, & Ecstasy written and danced, by Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, 1923

James Abbe – Dolores (Kathleen Rose), 1919

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores Ziegfeld fille) dans la conception de costumes de herpeacock par Pascaud de Paris, qu'elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores Ziegfeld fille) dans la conception de costumes de herpeacock par Pascaud de Paris, qu’elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores (Ziegfeld fille) dans son célèbre paon costumedesign par Pascaud de Paris, le costume qu'elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores (Ziegfeld fille) dans son célèbre costume design de paon par Pascaud de Paris, le costume qu’elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores (Ziegfeld fille) dans son célèbre costume design de paon par Pascaud de Paris, le costume qu'elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

James abbé -Kathleen Rose (connu sur scène comme Dolores (Ziegfeld fille) dans son célèbre costume design de paon par Pascaud de Paris, le costume qu’elle portait dans Minuit Frolic de 1919.

  

Florence Vandamm -Tilly Losch in the Band Wagon, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) - Tilly Losch paper snipe for Tilly Losch in the Band Wagon,  at the new amsterdam theatre musical, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) – Tilly Losch paper snipe for Tilly Losch in the Band Wagon, at the new amsterdam theatre musical, 1931

The Band Wagon est une revue (comédie musicale) américaine créée à Broadway en 1931.

Une parodie  des spectacles typiques de l’époque , comprenant,  plusieurs tableaux.

le casting était composé de

Tilly Losch  : La danseuse
Adele Astaire :   Ivy Meredith
Fred Astaire  :  Simpson Cater / Le démonstrateur
John Barker  :  Mr. Wallace  / Mr. Knipper
Helen Broderick  :  Sarah  / Mrs. Prescott
Helen Carrington  : Mrs. Boule
Philip Loeb  : Jasper  / Walker  / Mr. Leftwitch
Frank Morgan : Le colonel Jefferson Claghorne / L’inspecteur Cartwright
Francis Pierlot : Ely Cater / L’homme assassiné  / Mr. Cadwallader
Roberta Robinson :Miss Hutton
Jay Wilson : Martin Carter  / Un policier
Albertina Rasch Dancers

**************************

 

Livret / Sketches : George S. Kaufman et Howard Dietz

Paroles : Howard Dietz

Musique : Arthur Schwartz   (Vous pouvez écouter ICI deux morceaux restaurés)

Mise en scène et lumières : Hassart Short

Chorégraphie : Albertina Rasch

Décors : Albert R. Johnson

Costumes : Kiviette et Constance Ripley   fabriqués par Eaves Costume Co.

Producteur : Max Gordon

[STAGED by Hassard Short.] Scenary executed by Triangle Scenic Studio New Amsterdam Theatre,

Nombre de représentations : 260 // Date de la première : 3 juin 1931 – dernière : 16 janvier 1932

Toutes les représentations  ont eu lieu au  New Amsterdam Theatre, Broadway

Source wilkipedia

Vus trouverez Ici sur WordPresse sur le Blog de    Jacksonupperco.com   Un article que je trouve très complet sur The Band Wagon donc je vous y renvoie, pas la peine de le copier.

je vous conseille également de lire 4/5 pages sur google book  consacrées à Tilly Losch  et cette comédie musicale,  dans « Sing for Your Supper The Broadway Musical in the 1930s » Par Ethan Mordden

Vous trouvez des photos de cette comédie Musicale au Musée de New-York avec de mauvais credits !!! ( c’est quand même ahurissant puisqu’ils sont sur NPG  en noir et blanc et sans tampon du photographe /////Notifié Studio Vandamm

Florence Vandramm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch paper snipe for Tilly Losch in the Band Wagon, at new amsterdam theatre, 1931 [ crop]

 Les trois photographies qui suivent sont des scans du livre Parole de corps/ les couleurs ne sont pas très belles, mais c’est les seules photos de Tilly Losch de cette serie en couleur avec le tampon du photographe.

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931

 

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur's musical revue Schwart, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931

Ces photographies sont trouvables sur le net en noir et blanc et sans tampon du photographe sur nypl ou avec des mauvais crédits meme dans ce musée citant pourtant nplg

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931

Florence Vandramm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur's musical revue Schwart, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) – band wagon. at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931  ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon ,at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon ,at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Key sheet (4 shots) Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Key sheet (4 shots) Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon ,at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon ,at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm Tilly Losch, New York, 1931

Florence Vandamm Tilly Losch, New York, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch and Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch and Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch and Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 3

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch and Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931   ©mcny

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch Fred Astaire, Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch Fred Astaire, Albertina Rasch Dancers ,in The Band Wagon at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©mcny

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Scene from The Band Wagon, at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Scene from The Band Wagon, at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon Costume by Kiviette at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931 ©The New York Public Library

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon Costume by Kiviette at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931.

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch in costume of The Band Wagon Costume by Kiviette at New Amsterdam Theatre, 1931.© mcny.

 

Florence Vandamm (Vandamm Studio) -Tilly Losch, in The Band Wagon (Costume designed by Constance Ripley. A Howard Dietz-Arthur’s musical revue Schwart, 1931 ©mcny

Orval Hixon (1884-1982)

Orval Hixon  voulait être peintre, mais son daltonisme  a incité ses enseignants à l’orienter vers la photographie, mais ce déficit visuel est devenu l’un des plus grands attributs d’Hixon en définitive,  car il a vu la lumière comme personne… et ce fut son atout majeur pour son travail photographique.  

Lors de son adolescence, il a travaillé comme apprenti au sein de l’imprimerie  d’un journal  fournissant occasionnels son aide pour les portraits réalisés. Il a ensuite , et ce durant près d’une dizaine d’année travaillé comme  journaliste et réalisait des photographies pour ses articles. Fortement intéressé à la texture visuelle et de la disposition spatiale, il a étudié la photographie de portrait seul, au travers des magazines , et en participant  au  mouvement Arts & Crafts (toute personne travaillant et produisant  aux États-Unis pourrait être un artiste) . Il accepte en parallèle  un poste de technicien à la Studebaker Studios et en 1914, en partenariat avec Alice M. Knight, il a ouvert la Hixon-Knight Studio qui se spécialise dans le portrait des enfants.

les Affaires à Kansas City ( qu’on nommait « Le Paris des plaines ») étaient très compétitives entre plusieurs studios de photographie à  succès. Il y avait en cette place un esprit créatif commun qui a été fortement influencé par l’esthétique du mouvement Arts and Crafts. En particulier, le travail de portrait de Homer Peyton, de la Strauss-Peyton studio.  Peyton avait une réputation singulière pour l’utilisation de retouches directes sur des négatifs sur plaque de verre.  Hixon est très attiré par ce personnage et s’ inscrit à des cours d’art graphique à Art Institute  de la ville, et il se sépare de sa première collaboratrice.

Auprès d’Homer Peyton, il  a appris une palette précieuses de techniques graphiques qui lui ont permis de retoucher et de réinventer la négatifs-grattage, le dessin, le frottement, la dissolution, l’élimination et le marquage. Cette liberté créative élevée et le signe tout particulier du style distinctif d’ Hixon de l’éclairage de portrait lui apporte un grand succès.

En 1916,  James Hargis Connelly  ( un ancien acteur de vaudeville) , lui propose decollaborer avec lui  et de créer un studio si Hixon  lui enseigner la photographie. Ils ont formé la Main Street Studio  et cela immédiatement porté ses fruits. Connelly ayant un vaste réseau de relations dans les milieux de divertissement. Très vite, le succès grandit du milieu du théâtre, puis  celui ce la danse et des musiciens À la fin de 1916, il a produit une mémorable série de publicité portraits de vamp Valeska Suratt une actrice qui portait des costumes de haute couture coûteux sur scène, pour Fox Studio   et en janvier 1917 Hixon publie son premier portrait, de Ruth Saint Denis, dans le théâtre Magazine, une pionnière de la danse moderne très apprécié.( voir les trois planches ci dessous)

Orval Hixon- The silent actress  Valeska Suratt (one of the firts vamp with Theda bara ) , 1916

Orval Hixon- The silent actress Valeska Suratt (one of the firts vamp with Theda bara ) , 1916

Orval Hixon-  Plate for the serie of The silent actress  Valeska Suratt (one of the firts vamp with theda bara ) , 1916

Orval Hixon- Plate for the serie of The silent actress Valeska Suratt (one of the firts vamp with theda bara ) , 1916

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) - Ruth, St Denis, 1918

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) – Ruth, St Denis, 1918

Hixon était un maître de la lumière théâtrale. Son atelier  était équipé de lumières de scène de théâtre ce qui produisait des contrastes durs, et dramatiques, on a d’ailleurs l’impression que la majeure partie de ses portrait  sortent des ténèbres et les effets saillants sont extrêmement présent. Les sujets surgissent littéralement et se dessinent sur des fonds noirs. Hixon a « capitalisé » sur cette théâtralité, et beaucoup de ces images peuvent être facilement confondues avec des photos de production tournées sur la scène du théâtre, hors il n’en est rien. Les portraits de Hixon possèdent tous une  « intention » dans la composition, le contrôle du sujet.

Il a photographié le splus grands de son époque  Theodore Kosloff et Al Jolson , George Beban, Charlie Chaplin, Sammy Davis, Jr. Bessie Smith et Hadji Ali, Janette Hackett

En 1920, il a déménagé son studio à l’hôtel de Baltimore à seulement quelques pâtés de maisons. Considéré comme l’un des bâtiments les plus luxueux à l’ouest de Chicago, Baltimore a été entièrement construit en brique, le marbre et le ciment livré de l’Allemagne, etait le lieu où  Haute société, les voyageurs bien nantis et les présidents américains séjournaient lors de leur passage à Kansas city. Main Street Studio Hixon au Baltimore avait maintenant une entrée donnant sur la rue pour accueillir tous ceux qui voulaient un portrait, et même sans rendez-vous. Un bonus supplémentaire à cet endroit était la proximité de théâtres de vaudeville, burlesque et cinémas. Si bien qu’un  » trafic » constant de clients de l’hôtel, d’ amateurs de théâtre et de nombreux acteurs faisait le pied de guerre aux portes du studio…. Jusqu’en 1938, quand les portes de la Baltimore fermés, Hixon a photographié des centaines de personnes qui « marchaient dans la rue et dans mon studio. Mais ce sont les gens de théâtre qui ont été une grande source d’inspiration.  Il avait d’ailleurs bien pensé les choses, car il  a très vite compris l’importance de la publicité et de l’auto-promotion. Il a donc  renoncé à ses droit d’auteur en échange du fait qu’il  frappait chaque impression  qui a quittait le studio de son tampon, et ces dernières pouvaient apparaître dans les publications de journaux et ainsi lui faire une grande publicité…

Le succès commercial de Hixon lui a permis d’ouvrir deux autres studios à Liberty, Missouri, et Manhattan, Kansas. . Il a également contracté à court terme des partenariats avec H. Kenyon Newman (1923) et James A. Wiese (1926, 1928). Mais, en 1930le  vaudeville est sur son déclin . Hixon et tout le monde le sait et il prend une décision prudente, celle de fermer le studio de Kansas City et de déménager à Lawrence  où il a maintenu l’entreprise jusqu’en 1958.

A mes yeux, il est un roi de la lumière,avec une vision romantique de la féminité , presque lyrique, ses images ont un parfum de mystère et son d’une intensité presque gothique.

Les photographies proviennent du livre  Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon, The University of Kansas, 1971 ( la couverture est plus bas).

 

Orval  Hixon--Zoe Barnett Vaudeville Entertainer,1920  Figure Study (Chains) By KC Artist Photographer Orval Hixon

Orval Hixon–Zoe Barnett ( performer Musical, Comedy, Operetta) Vaudeville Entertainer,1920 Figure Study (Chains) By KC Artist Photographer Orval Hixon

Orval Hixon- Miss Janette Hackett, 1920

Orval Hixon- Janette Hackett, 1921

Orval  Hixon-Miss Hackett    , 1920

Orval Hixon-   Janette Hackett , 1921

Orval Hixon- Denishawn Dancer Figure Study Vanda  hoff (DeniShawn dancer and 3rd wife of Paul Whiteman (King Of Jazz). 1922

Orval Hixon- Denishawn Dancer Figure Study Vanda hoff (DeniShawn dancer and 3rd wife of Paul Whiteman (King Of Jazz). 1922

Orval  Hixon-Denishawn Dancer Figure Study Vanda  hoff (DeniShawn dancer and 3rd wife of Paul Whiteman (King Of Jazz). 1922

Orval Hixon-Denishawn Dancer Figure Study Vanda hoff (DeniShawn dancer and 3rd wife of Paul Whiteman (King Of Jazz). 1922

Orval  Hixon- Bobbie Tremain -1920

Orval Hixon-the performer  Bobbie Tremain -1920

Orval  Hixon- June Eldredge  1921

Orval Hixon- The actress June Eldredge 1921

Orval  Hixon-Miss Janette Hackett, 1920 from the book, Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon,The University of Kan

Orval Hixon- the actress Janette Hackett, 1920

Orval Hixon - Hazel Flint  ,  1920

Orval Hixon – the actress Hazel Flint , 1920

Orval  Hixon- Miss Francis Field,, 1921

Orval Hixon- Miss Francis Field, (Sally Margaret Field ) 1921

Orval Hixon - Bothwell Browne  ,  1920

Orval Hixon – Bothwell Browne , 1920

Orval Hixon- Miss Janette Hackett, 1920

Orval Hixon- Miss Janette Hackett, 1920

Orval  Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer  , 1918-20

Orval Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1918-20

Orval  Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer  , 1918-20

Orval Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1918-20

Orval Hixon - Dorothy Knowles (vaudeville dancer), 1920s

Orval Hixon – Dorothy Knowles (vaudeville dancer), 1920s

Orval Hixon- Francis Field, 1920

Orval Hixon- Francis Field, 1920

Orval Hixon- Evelyn Nesbit Thaw (1885-1967) 1920

Orval Hixon- Evelyn Nesbit Thaw, 1920

Orval  Hixon-G. Theda Bara, 1921

Orval Hixon-  Theda Bara, 1921

Orval  Hixon-Billie Cassin (Joan Crawford) 1924

Orval Hixon-Billie Cassin (Joan Crawford) 1924

Orval Hixon-Billie Cassin (Joan Crawford), 1924

Orval Hixon-Billie Cassin (Joan Crawford), 1924

Orval Hixon-Ernestine Meyers, 1925 1

Orval Hixon-Ernestine Meyers, 1925 1

Orval Hixon- Ernestine Meyers 1920 from the book, Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon,The University of Kans

Orval Hixon- Ernestine Meyers 1920 from the book, Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon,The University of Kans

Orval Hixon -portrait of Herbert Clifton, 1921

Orval Hixon -portrait of Herbert Clifton, 1921

Orval  Hixon-Pauline Frederick  1925

Orval Hixon- The actress Pauline Frederick 1925

Orval  Hixon- Grace La Rue  a music hall performer ,1920

Orval Hixon- Grace La Rue a music hall performer ,1920

Orval  Hixon- Grace La Rue  a music hall performer , 1920

Orval Hixon- Grace La Rue a music hall performer , 1920

Orval Hixon- Grace La Rue,  a music hall performer , 1920

Orval Hixon- Grace La Rue, a music hall performer , 1920

Orval  Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1919-1920

Orval Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1919-1920

Orval  Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer  , 1920

Orval Hixon-Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Untitled  , Pauline Lord , 1920

Orval Hixon-Untitled , Pauline Lord , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Veleska Surratt( Vampire in Silent Movies) , 1919

Orval Hixon-Veleska Surratt( Vampire in Silent Movies) , 1919

Orval Hixon -Beth Beri 1922 Figure Study (Front) By KC Artist Photographer Orval Hixon

Orval Hixon -Beth Beri 1922 Figure Study (Front) By KC Artist Photographer Orval Hixon

Orval Hixon - Orval Hixon -dancer Alcova, 1922

Orval Hixon – Orval Hixon -dancer Alcova, 1922

Orval  Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1919-1920

Orval Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1919-1920

Orval  Hixon-Beth Beri   , 1920 1

Orval Hixon-Beth Beri , 1925

Orval  Hixon-Annette Kellerm , 1920

Orval Hixon-Annette Kellerm , 1920

Orval  Hixon- Sammy Baird  , 1923

Orval Hixon- Sammy Baird , 1925

Orval Hixon - Orval Hixon -Sammy Baird, 1925

Orval Hixon – Sammy Baird, 1925

Orval  Hixon- Emma Haig 1920

Orval Hixon- Emma Haig 1920

Orval Hixon -portrait of unknown female, 1925

Orval Hixon -portrait of unknown female, 1925

Orval  Hixon-Untiteled, 1920-22

Orval Hixon-Untiteled, 1920-22

Orval  Hixon- Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval Hixon- Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval  Hixon-Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval Hixon-Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval  Hixon-Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval Hixon-Cleveland Bronner, 1918

Orval  Hixon-Beth Beri , 1920

Orval Hixon-Beth Beri , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Beth Beri   1920

Orval Hixon-Beth Beri 1920

Orval  Hixon- Grace Darling  ( Actress )Figure study ,1920

Orval Hixon- Grace Darling ( Actress )Figure study ,1920

Orval  Hixon- Portrait of unknown  vaudeville dancer , 1925

Orval Hixon- Portrait of unknown vaudeville dancer , 1925

Orval  Hixonl  Flying Alcova ( model Anna Alcovawas a vaudeville dancer who toured the circuits in the early 1920s.) ,1920

Orval Hixonl Flying Alcova ( model Anna Alcova was a vaudeville dancer who toured the circuits in the early 1920s.) ,1920

Orval  Hixon-Florence -O’denishawn (Dancer) , 1919

Orval Hixon-Florence -O’denishawn (Dancer) , 1919

Orval  Hixon-Florence O’denishawn (Dancer) , 1919

Orval Hixon-Florence O’denishawn (Dancer) , 1919

Orval  Hixon-Flying Alcova    , 1920

Orval Hixon-Alcova , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Louise Riley , 1920

Orval Hixon-Louise Riley , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Mrs. Zamboni, 1918

Orval Hixon-Mrs. Zamboni, 1918

Orval  Hixon-Pearl Harper , 1920

Orval Hixon-Pearl Harper , 1920

Orval Hixon - Nance O'Neil (1874-1965) , 1918

Orval Hixon – Nance O’Neil (1874-1965) , 1918

Orval  Hixon- Mlle. Fouchon,  performer ,1920

Orval Hixon- Mlle. Fouchon, performer ,1920

Orval  Hixon-  Zoe Barnett ,1920

Orval Hixon- Zoe Barnett ,1920

Orval  Hixon- ( Hixon-Newman studios) , 1922-25

Orval Hixon- ( Hixon-Newman studios)-Ernestine Meyers (or Tot Qualters) c.1921

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio)  -Ina Hayward (Theatrical actress), 1920s

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) -Ina Hayward (Theatrical actress), 1920s

Orval  Hixon-Vanda Hoff , 1920

Orval Hixon-Vanda Hoff , 1920

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) Ernestine Meyers 1918-20

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) Ernestine Meyers 1918-20

Orval Hixon  (Hixon-Connelly studio) Pauline Frederick, 1920s

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) Pauline Frederick, 1920s

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) -Marjorie Gateson, 1920

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) -Marjorie Gateson, 1920

Orval Hixon book, Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon,The University of Kansas Museum of Art, 1971

Orval Hixon book, Main Street Studio An Exhibtion of Photographs of Famous Vaudeville Entertainers by Orval Hixon,The University of Kansas Museum of Art, 1971

d’autres planches ne faisant pas parties du livre

Orval  Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1920 &

Orval Hixon- Unidentified Vaudeville Entertainer , 1920

Orval  Hixon-Singer Midgets ,1925

Orval Hixon-Singer Midgets ,1925

Orval  Hixon-Ruth Saint-Denis , 1918

Orval Hixon-Ruth Saint-Denis , 1918 Ici dans une autre teinte

Orval  Hixon-Portrait of Cleveland Bronner   , 1920

Orval Hixon-Portrait of Cleveland Bronner , 1920

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio)  Ruth St Denis and Ted Shawnin Tillers of the Soil, 1916

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) Ruth St Denis and Ted Shawn in Tillers of the Soil, 1916 ici

Orval Hixon  (Hixon-Connelly studio) Ruth St Denis, 1916

Orval Hixon (Hixon-Connelly studio) Ruth St Denis, 1916 ici dans une autre teinte

Orval  Hixon- Ruth St. Denis  ,1919

Orval Hixon- Ruth St. Denis ,1919 ici dans une autre version

Orval  Hixon -Ruth St Denis in Greek Veil Plastique., 1920

Orval Hixon -Ruth St Denis in Greek Veil Plastique., 1920 Ici

Le site qui lui est consacré mais toutes les photos ont malheureusement un gros marquage ce qui gâche le plaisir

Valeska Gert

 » Gertrud Valesca Somes, dite Valeska Gert, née le 11 janvier 1892 à Berlin et morte entre le 15 et 18 mars 1978 à Kampen sur l’île de Sylt, est une danseuse, humoriste et actrice allemande. Artiste autodidacte née dans une famille bourgeoise de Juifs berlinois, elle a commencé à danser à 9 ans. Elle s’est, par la suite, produite en solo dans des personnages très éloignés de la bourgeoisie, pour mieux la caricaturer. Elle peint des personnages marginaux : « Parce que je n’aimais pas les bourgeois, je dansais des personnages qu’ils méprisaient, prostituées, entremetteuses, marginaux, dépravés. » Dans l’une de ses prestations remarquables, elle exprime par son corps un cri sans son. Réfractaire à toutes les écoles, elle s’inscrit toutefois dans le courant expressionniste. Sa danse, contrairement à Wigman, se révèle virulente et provocatrice. Elle croque au vitriol les travers des classes moyennes et illustre le rythme frénétique de la vie moderne.
Elle a également fait une partie de sa carrière au cinéma qu’elle a débuté en 1915 avec Maria Mossi. Elle fait ses débuts de danseuse en 1916 dans un cinéma de la UFA (Universum Film AG), l’une des sociétés de production cinématographiques les plus importantes de l’Allemagne de la première moitié du XIXe siècle. Sur cette lancée, elle est engagée dans plusieurs théâtres. Entrée en contact avec les dadaïstes berlinois, elle s’oriente vers le cabaret : un genre qui mêle la chanson, la danse, le théâtre, le cirque, la poésie d’avant garde, le cinéma et la satire politique, et qui connait à cette époque un vif succès. En effet, pendant l’entre-deux-guerres, de nombreux cabarets vont apparaître dans toute l’Europe, en Allemagne et surtout à Berlin. Contrairement au cabaret français ou américain, qui se sont centrés sur les loisirs réservés à une certaine catégorie de la population (haute bourgeoisie), le cabaret berlinois sert aussi à exprimer des opinions politiques, et des convictions personnelles. Dans ce cadre, Valeska Gert va, au travers de sa gestualité, montrer son aversion face à la bourgeoisie et une nouvelle façon de danser. On la considère parfois comme l’une des pionnières de la danse contemporaine.

« Quand je faisais du théâtre, je regrettais la danse, et quand je dansais le théâtre me manquait. Le conflit a duré jusqu’à ce que l’idée me vienne de réunir les deux : je voulais danser des personnages. »

Elle va se produire dans un cabaret du nom de « Schall und Rauch », et va ouvrir son propre cabaret « le Kohlkopp » (tête de chou). Son art est basé sur l’alliance du burlesque et du grotesque dans le but de provoquer. Ses solos les plus célèbres sont « la mort », « la boxe », « le cirque », « la nourrice », « la canaille », thèmes ou personnages issus de la vie quotidienne de Valeska Gert.


en 1932, Valeska Gert ouvre un cabaret à Berlin : « le Kohlkopp « . Ses activités sont interrompues par l’arrivée des nazis au pouvoir. En 1938, elle part pour New York et connait là bas des débuts difficiles et sera obligée de subvenir à ses moyens en vivant de petits boulots (vaisselle dans les restaurants, etc…). Elle travaillera ensuite dans le cabaret Beggar’s bar à New York. « La guerre touchait à sa fin. Berlin fut bombardé de fond en comble, ma ville, la ville où je suis née. J’en souffrais jusqu’à la moelle. J’étais atteinte dans chaque nerf. Bientôt la paix allait venir. Je n’étais plus qu’à moitié en Amérique. Je n’avais jamais eu l’intention d’y rester. Dès que le nazis seraient loin, j’y retournerais. J’aime l’Europe, ce contient à l’habitat si dense, où l’on est si proche de l’autre qu’un courant électrique passe, on l’appelle « atmosphère. »

Elle retournera en 1947 en Europe et sera récompensée par un ruban d’Or. Après sa mort, en 1978, elle sera inhumée dans le cimetière de Ruhleben à Berlin.  » Source wilkipedia 

une autre bio ici très bien faite

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918 fig 2

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918 fig 2

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918 fig 3

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918 fig 3

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918

Atelier Leopold- The Jewish cabaret artist Valeska Gert München (Munich)., 1918

Photo Atlantic- Valeska Gert, 1918-19

Photo Atlantic- Valeska Gert, 1918-19

Berliner Illustrations-Gesellschaft -Valeska Gert, dans sa danse Japanische Groteske Berlin, 1917

Berliner Illustrations-Gesellschaft -Valeska Gert, dans sa danse Japanische Groteske Berlin, 1917

Unknown photographer- Diseuse, Portrait Of Valeska Gert, 1919

Unknown photographer- Diseuse, Portrait Of Valeska Gert, 1919

Käte Ruppel- Pause , Valeska Gert,1926

Käte Ruppel- Pause , Valeska Gert,1920s

Binder Valeska Gert , 1926

Binder Valeska Gert , 1926

Binder Valeska Gert , 1933

Binder Valeska Gert , 1933

Lisette Model- Valeska Gert, Ole , 1940 (national G of canada)

Lisette Model- Valeska Gert, Ole , 1940 (national G of canada)

James Abbe Valeska Gert , 1926

James Abbe Valeska Gert , 1926

Heinrich Hoffmann- Valeska Gert, 1930

Heinrich Hoffmann- Valeska Gert, 1930

Elli Marcus- Valeska Gert 1930

Jaro von Tucholka – Valeska Gert, Portrait au chapeau, 1926

Suse Byk – Valeska Gert Term study on the piano, Opus 1, composition on ausgeleierten piano ‘- published in Tempo 12.10.1929

Suse Byk – Valeska Gert Dance pose as clown 1928

Suse Byk – Valeska Gert Dance pose as clown 1928

Kurt Huebschmann- Valeska Gert Portrait, as teller of fairy tales at the broadcast, 1930

Lotte Jacobi – Valeska Gert 1930-39

Umbo (Otto Umbehr), Valeska Gert, 1930s Gelatin silver print glossy print in 1975

Valeska Gert 1926

Valeska Gert Dance study- 1927

Valeska Gert as salomé

Valeska Gert by hans casparius early 1930

Valeska Gert

Man Ray - Valeska Gert, vers 1925

Man Ray – Valeska Gert, vers 1925

 

Man Ray Valeska Gert , 1925

Man Ray Valeska Gert , 1925

Valeska Gert as Boxer Lotte Jacobi 1927

Tänzerin Valeska Gert, Debut 1919, Photographer unknown

Photo Atlantic- Valeska Gert , in Tod

Uncredited – Valeska Gert parodying a coloratura singer. Photo, c. 1925

 Un Lien .lacinemathequedeladanse

James Abbe

James Abbe Folies Bergère tableau vivant  spectacle des Ziegfeld Follies ( costumes designed by James Ben Ali Haggi)

James Abbe Folies Bergère « tableau vivant spectacle desZiegfeld Follies ( costumes designed by James Ben Ali Haggi)


James Edward Abbe The Dolly Sisters 1927

James Edward Abbe The Dolly Sisters 1927


James Abbe - Backstage, French and English girls at the Moulin Rouge, 1926

James Abbe – Backstage, French and English girls at the Moulin Rouge, 1926


James Abbe -Backstage at the Folies Bergère, Paris,1926.

James Abbe -Backstage at the Folies Bergère, Paris,1926.


James Abbe - Sisters G, 1920

James Abbe – Sisters G, 1920

 

Arnold Genthe Some nudes

Arnold Genthe - Modern Nude in Transparency, 1920 Silver Nitrate Camera

Arnold Genthe – Modern Nude in Transparency, 1920 Silver Nitrate Camera

Arnold Genthe. Carolyn m Pierson, 1928

Arnold Genthe. Carolyn m Pierson, 1928

Arnold Genthe -  Nude in Transparency, 1920 Silver Nitrate Camera

Arnold Genthe – Nude in Transparency, 1920 Silver Nitrate Camera

 

Arnold Genthe - Nude 1929 Arnold Genthe - nude 1929 Silver Nitrate Camera

Arnold Genthe – Nude 1929 Arnold Genthe – nude 1929 Silver Nitrate Camera

Arnold Genthe-Allegretto, Nude woman in dance pose., 1910

Arnold Genthe-Allegretto, Nude woman in dance pose., 1910

 

Arnold Genthe -Torso Study, 1920

Arnold Genthe -Torso Study, 1920

Arnold Genthe - nude Modern ballet  1929.

Arnold Genthe – nude Modern ballet 1929.

Arnold Genthe -Two nudes ( Irma Duncan dancers) March, 1929

Arnold Genthe -Two nudes ( Irma Duncan dancers) March, 1929

Arnold Genthe -the model as  the statue , late 1920

Arnold Genthe -the model as the statue , late 1920

Arnold Genthe- Lee Miller, 1920s

Arnold Genthe- Lee Miller, 1920s

Arnold Genthe- Lee Miller, 1920s

Arnold Genthe- Lee Miller, 1920s

 

Arnold Genthe -Mildred Gillars( aka Axis Sally), 1910

Arnold Genthe -Mildred Gillars( aka Axis Sally), 1910

Arnold Genthe -Martha Graham, 1928

Arnold Genthe -Martha Graham, 1928

Arnold Genthe- The dancer Arnold Genthe, 1921

Arnold Genthe- The dancer  Desha Delteil, 1921

 

Arnold Genthe - Desha and Leah dancing , 1921._e

Arnold Genthe – Desha and Leah dancing , 1921.

Arnold Genthe -Violet Marcellus dancing,1918_e

Arnold Genthe -Violet Marcellus dancing,1918

 

Arnold Genthe - The dance, allegro [Model, Hilda, 1918-21

Arnold Genthe – The dance, allegro [Model, Hilda], 1918-21

Arnold Genthe -Irene Marcellus,( Ziegfeld Follies girl) 1920s

Arnold Genthe -Irene Marcellus,( Ziegfeld Follies girl) 1920s

 

Arnold Genthe -four nude dancers in a Grecian tableau from the troupe of Marion Morgan Dancers, March 1922

Arnold Genthe -four nude dancers in a Grecian tableau from the troupe of Marion Morgan Dancers, March 1922 [The Marion Morgan Dancers was a troupe of predominantly female dancers founded and led by Marion Morgan  who performed interpretative dances based on classical legends and antiquity. they appeared nearly 1916 ]@ New-York Historical Society

Arnold Genthe -four nude dancers in a Grecian tableau from the troupe of Marion Morgan Dancers, March 1922

Arnold Genthe -four nude dancers in a Grecian tableau from the troupe of Marion Morgan Dancers, March 1922 [The Marion Morgan Dancers was a troupe of predominantly female dancers founded and led by Marion Morgan  who performed interpretative dances based on classical legends and antiquity. they appeared nearly 1916 ]@ New-York Historical Society

Arnold Genthe. Mme Erna carise with dog, 1928

Arnold Genthe. Mme Erna Carise with dog, 1928

Les autochromes

Arnold Genthe-  Marion Morgan Dancers 1906-17

Arnold Genthe- Marion Morgan Dancers 1906-17